2010: The Year the Second Amendment Dies?

Posted on January 13, 2010. Filed under: Enemies of The State, General Info | Tags: , , , , , , |

I don’t like what my gut is telling me. The constant assault by UN driven policy in the United States. With all of the executive orders being signed, not just the ones signed by President Obama since taking office, but going back many years as detailed in a column I wrote several months back, something is going on. A closer look at the coming assault later this year on our guns makes everything make a little more sense. It’s all here. I am not telling you what to think, but I am giving you a heads up – they ARE coming for your guns. What I lay out here is just the tip of the iceberg. If you follow these leads given you here, you will see a virtual mountain of evidence. Please sign the petition against US participation in the UN Small Arms Treaty. The EO’s involving martial law are linked above. In addition are the two signed in the past week or two by the President. They are EO12425 (an amendment regarding allowing special privileges to Interpol) and (no number given) one creating a Council of Governors to oversee National Guard. The next meeting on the Small Arms Treaty is in New York in mid July. I hope the NRA will launch a tea party demonstration that dwarfs the 1.7 million who were at the capital on 09/12/2009. Please, if you care anything of the second amendment, watch this NRA video:
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.un.org/disarmament/
 
http://www.un.org/disarmament/convarms/SALW/Html/SALW-PoA-ISS_intro.shtml
 
Armed Violence and Development
Increasingly, it is understood that social and economic development can only take off if people feel safe in their communities. This concept brings together issues of disarmament and development in an exciting new way. The 2009 Secretary-General’s report:
http://daccess-dds-ny.un.org/doc/UNDOC/GEN/N09/443/56/PDF/N0944356.pdf?OpenElement
 
Summary

Armed violence — the intentional, threatened or actual use of arms to inflict death or injury — takes many forms, ranging from political to criminal to interpersonal violence, and appears in a wide range of contexts. Armed violence not only destroys lives, it also damages infrastructure and property, limits the delivery of public services, undermines investment in human, social and economic capital, and contributes to unproductive expenditures on security services. Armed violence undermines development and constitutes an impediment to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals. The present report examines different aspects of the relationship between armed violence and development. Across diverse contexts, the risk factors and effects of armed violence are often similar. Young men make up the majority of perpetrators, as well as victims, of armed violence. In certain situations — including in some armed conflicts — women, girls and boys suffer from acute forms of sexual violence. Factors such as weak institutions, systemic economic and horizontal inequalities, exclusion of minority groups, unequal gender relations, limited education opportunities, persistent  unemployment, organized crime and illicit markets, and the availability of firearms, alcohol and drugs play an important role in shaping the onset, duration and severity of armed violence.

The United Nations system, regional and subregional organizations, national and local governments, and civil society organizations have mobilized to prevent and reduce armed violence through evidence-based interventions, but responses need to be scaled up. Armed violence prevention and reduction efforts must be carefully designed, targeted and monitored. Programming options include interventions related to conflict prevention and peacebuilding, to interventions targeting demand and risk factors at the individual, relationship and societal levels.

The report places particular emphasis on tackling the risks and effects of armed violence and underdevelopment. This includes implementing existing conventions and agreements associated with armed violence and development; improving the effectiveness of armed violence prevention and reduction policies through investment in the production, analysis and use of evidence; strengthening capacities to diagnose, articulate strategies and implement programmes; developing measurable goals, targets and indicators for armed violence prevention and reduction; building partnerships among the United Nations system and with regional organizations, national authorities and civil society to ensure coherent policy and programming; increasing resources for armed violence prevention and reduction; and fostering greater international action.

V. Observations and recommendations

63. Tackling armed violence successfully requires coordinated responses that draw on different areas of expertise. Many Governments, civil society actors and United Nations entities are starting to work together to address risk factors and the negative effects of armed violence on development, but the international response is still somewhat fragmented. In bringing together donors, Governments of affected States and civil society, as well as in uniting core competencies and developing good practices, the United Nations system is well-positioned to help catalyse more coherent, comprehensive, coordinated and integrated initiatives, and to encourage targeted armed violence prevention and reduction policies and programmes at the international, national and local levels.

64. In order to be successful, policy responses must involve meaningful and legitimate local ownership, and full partnerships between Governments and civil society. They must also be integrated into regional and subregional approaches.

65. In order to be effective in its role as a convenor and catalyst, the United Nations system, as well as national and local governments and civil society, will need to scale up support to affected States in designing and implementing armed violence prevention and response strategies. The following recommendations are proposed:

(a) Strengthen the implementation of existing global conventions and agreements. There is a range of existing agreements that can contribute to the prevention and reduction of armed violence. United Nations agencies should support national Governments to uphold, implement and strengthen existing global and regional norms and measures, including relevant international and regional treaties, conventions and other instruments that contribute to the reduction and prevention of all forms of armed violence. These include the Firearms Protocol; the Programme of Action; the universal conventions and protocols against terrorism; the three conventions on narcotic drugs; the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; the International Covenants on Civil and Political Rights and on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; the conventions on the rights of women and children; Security Council resolutions 1325 (2000) and 1820 (2008) on women, peace and security; and the 2005 World Summit Outcome document. There should also be a concerted effort to ensure that international norms and standards are reflected and implemented at the national and local levels through the adoption of national legislation and other domestic measures.

(b) Improve the effectiveness of armed violence prevention and reduction policies and programmes through investments in the production, analysis and use of evidence. Effective approaches to armed-violence prevention and reduction will require investments by national Governments and international organizations in high-quality data-gathering and analysis capacities. Comprehensive, reliable and timely information is critical for informed policymaking and programming, monitoring and evaluation, and the forecasting of future trends and needs. This will involve ongoing and baseline data collection and analysis, the regular transfer of knowledge and lessons learned and innovative approaches to bring evidence and analysis into the programming process. The most comprehensive picture of conflict, non-conflict and interpersonal armed violence is likely to be obtained from a combination of data drawn from the public health and criminal justice systems, combined with population-based surveys, civil society monitoring, as well as rich historical and cultural research. Routine monitoring and evaluation of armed violence prevention programmes will increase the range of evidence-based options to prevent armed violence available to national authorities, local authorities and civil society.

(c) Strengthen national and local capacities for armed violence prevention and reduction. States have the primary responsibility for preventing and reducing armed violence. Multilateral and bilateral agencies can support Governments of affected countries by strengthening national and local capacities to address armed violence, including capacities to collect reliable data on the scope and scale of armed violence and victimization, and on different risk and resilience factors. This could include the development of national armed violence prevention and reduction strategies, investments in national and local surveillance systems, establishment of effective criminal justice systems based upon the rule of law, including reinforcement of counter-terrorism and policing capacities, and support for programmes targeting specific risk factors and at-risk groups. International agencies and national Governments can also ensure that armed violence prevention and reduction practices are integrated into wider development strategies, such as United Nations Development Assistance Frameworks, Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers, and other national and local plans. Local actors and in particular governments, community authorities (including local governments and community peace and security committees), research institutions and the media should be supported and strengthened in order to design, implement and measure the effectiveness of local strategies and interventions. Several United Nations stakeholders can be involved in these activities, including the three United Nations regional centres for peace and disarmament.

(d) Develop measurable goals, targets and indicators for armed-violence prevention and reduction. A growing body of evidence demonstrates how armed violence hinders the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and, more generally, social, economic, political and human development. Yet armed violence reduction efforts are seldom incorporated into strategies for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. The Millennium Development Goal Review Process, starting in 2010, provides an opportunity to consider the reduction of armed violence as an important requisite to meeting the Millennium Development Goals, in particular through the development and endorsement of a set of goals, targets and indicators to achieve measurable reductions in armed violence and tangible improvements in human security. Developing measurable goals on armed violence towards 2015 will offer the opportunity to integrate security-related themes into the possible follow-up of the Millennium Development Goals (see S/2008/258).

 
http://www.iansa.org/un/index.htm
 

First Committee of the UN General Assembly, 2009

Throughout October 2009, governments are attending the First Committee, which proposes and adopts resolutions on disarmament and international security. Their discussions include resolutions on the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) and small arms control. North American Members List is shown below. Contact information provided for your convenience.

 
 
Canada  
Amnesty International – Canada
214 Montreal Road
Ottawa
Ontario
K1L 1A4
CANADA
Telephone: + 1 613 744 7667
Fax: + 1 613 746 2411
hhomes@amnesty.ca
www.amnesty.ca
Canadian Peacebuilding Coordinating Committee (CPCC)
1, Rue Nicholas Street, #1216
Ottawa
Ontario
K1N 7B7
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 241 3446
Fax: +1 613 241 4846
cpcc@web.ca
www.peacebuild.ca
Coalition for Gun Control
3300 Boulevard Rosemont
Bureau 211
Montreal
Quebec
HIX 1K2
CANADA
Telephone: +1 514 725 2021
Fax: +1 514 725 5926
cgc_montreal@compuserve.com
www.guncontrol.ca
Group of 78
145 Spruce Street, Suite 206
Ottawa
Ontario
K1R 6P1
CANADA
Telephone: +1 230 0860
Fax: +1 563 0017
group78@web.ca
www.hri.ca/partners/g78
One Sky
PO Box 3352
Smithers
BC
V0J 2NO
CANADA
Telephone: +1 250 877 6030
Fax: +1 250 877 6040
nikki@onesky.ca
www.onesky.ca
Oxfam Canada
300 – 294 Albert Street
Ottawa
Ontario
K1P 6E6
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 237 5236
Fax: +1 613 237 0524
elizabethb@ott.oxfam.ca
www.oxfam.ca
Physicians for Global Survival (PGS)
208-145 Spruce Street
Ottawa
Ontario
K1R 6P1
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 233 1982
Fax: +1 613 223 9028
pgs@web.ca
www.pgs.ca
Project Ploughshares
57 Erb Street West
Waterloo
Ontario
N2L 6C2
CANADA
Telephone: +1 519 888 6541
Fax: +1 519 888 0018
lgriffiths@ploughshares.ca eregehr@ploughshares.ca
www.ploughshares.ca
Small Arms Firearms Education Research Network (SAFER-Net)
3300 Boulevard Rosemont
Bureau 211
Montreal
Quebec
HIX 1K2
CANADA
Telephone: +1 416 979 5000 ext. 6740
Fax: +1 416 979 5249
wcukier@ryerson.ca
www.ryerson.ca/SAFER-Net
South Asia Partnership – Canada (SAP Canada)
1 Nicholas Street
Suite 200
Ottawa
Ontario
K1N 7B7
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 241 1333
Fax: +1 613 241 1129
sap@sapcanada.org
ffaisel@sapcanada.org
www.sapcanada.org
David Jackman (individual)
95 Main Street
Apt. 206
Ottawa
Ontario
K1S 1B8
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 237 8762
djackman@cyberus.ca
Peggy Mason (individual)
2077 Kinburn Side Road
RR#2 Kinburn
Ontario
K2A 2H0
CANADA
Telephone: +1 613 832 9322
peggymason@bellnet.ca
Alan Simons (individual)
1 Kenwood Avenue,
Suite 2,
Toronto
Ontario
Canada M6C 2R6
Tel. (416) 473.0354
Skype: alansimons
alansimons@rogers.com
 
 
United States
Go to the top of the page
Adopt-A-Minefield, UNA-USA
801 Second Avenue
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 907 1314
Fax: +1 212 682 9185
mburke@unausa.org
www.landmines.org
Amnesty International – USA – Military, Security and Police Transfers Working Group
202 East Riverside Street
Williamston
MI
48895
USA
Telephone: +1 202 544 0200
Fax: +1 202 546 7142
swaltz@umich.edu
www.amnestyusa.org/arms_trade
Arms Trade Resource Center
66 Fifth Avenue
9th Floor
New York
NY
10011
USA
Telephone: +1 212 229 5808
Fax: +1 212 229 5579
berrigaf@newschool.edu
www.worldpolicy.org/projects/arms
Coalition To Stop Gun Violence – USA (CSGV)
1023 15th Street NW
Suite 600
Washington
DC
20005
USA
Telephone: +1 202 408 0061
Fax: +1 202 408 0062
mikebeard@csgv.org
www.csgv.org
Crime Gun Solutions LLC (CGS)
2214 West Greenleaf Drive
Frederick
Maryland
21702
USA
Telephone: +1 301 631 2950
Fax: +1 301 631 2950
JJVinceCGS@aol.com
Derechos Human Rights
46 Estabrook Street
San Leandro
California
94577
USA
Phone: +1 510 483 4005
Fax: +1 603 372 9710
marga@derechos.org
www.derechos.org
Economists Allied for Arms Reduction (ECAAR)
330 East 38th Street
New York
NY
10016
USA
Telephone: +1 212 490 6494
Fax: +1 212 490 6494
lucywebster@ecaar.org
www.ecaar.org
Firearm Injury Center – Medical College of Wisconsin
Medical College of Wisconsin
8701 Watertown Plank Road
Milwaukee
WI
53226
USA
Telephone: +1 414 456 7676, +1 414 456 7670
Fax: +1 414 456 6472
hargart@mcw.edu
rlwjd@mcw.edu
www.mcw.edu/fic
Five College Program in Peace and World Security Studies
Hampshire College
893 West Street
Northampton
MA
01002
USA
Telephone: +1 413 559 5563
Fax: +1 413 559 5620
mklare@hampshire.edu
www.hampshire.edu
Franciscans International
211 East 43rd Street.
Room 1100
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 490 4624
Fax: +1 866 283 0134
fdeacon@franciscansinternational.org
Global Action to Prevent War
GAPW c/o LCNP
211 East 43rd Street
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 818 1861
Fax: +1 212 818 1857
coordinator@globalactionpw.org
www.globalactionpw.org
HELP Network
2300 Children’s Plaza #88
Chicago
IL
60614
USA
Telephone: +1 773 880 3826
Fax: +1 773 880 6615
contact@helpnetwork.org
www.helpnetwork.org
Human Rights Watch – Arms Division – USA
1630 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 500 Washington
DC
20009
USA
Telephone: +1 202 612 4321
Fax: +1 202 612 4333
arms@hrw.org
www.hrw.org
International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW)
727 Massachusetts Avenue. 2nd floor Cambridge
MA
02139
USA
Telephone: +1 617 868 5050 ext 203
Fax: +1 617 868 2560
mvalenti@ippnw.org
www.ippnw.org
Join Together
Boston University School of Public Health
1 Appleton Street
Boston
MA
02116
USA
Telephone: +1 617 437 1500
Fax: +1 617 437 9394
info@jointogether.org
www.jointogether.org
Legal Community Against Violence (LCAV)
Firearms Law Center
268 Bush Street, Suite 555
San Francisco
CA
94104
USA
Telephone: +1 415 433 2062
Fax: +1 415 433 3357
www.firearmslawcenter.org
Maha Vajra Films
2811 Iroquois Road
Wihnette
IL 60091
USA
Phone: +1 847 736 1954
jamiemurrayiii@hotmail.com
Million Mom March / Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence
1225 Eye Street NW, Suite 1100
Washington
DC
20005
USA
Telephone: +1 202 289 7319
Fax: +1 202 408 1851
stopgunvio@aol.com
www.stategunlaws.org
www.gunlawsuits.org
www.millionmommarch.org
Monterey Institute of International Studies – Program on Security & Development (SAND)
460 Pierce Street
Monterey
CA
93940
USA
Telephone: +1 831 647 4142
Fax: +1 831 647 4199
elaurance@miis.edu
www.cns.miis.edu
New Yorkers Against Gun Violence
Telephone: +1 212-679-2345
Fax: +1 212-679-2484
nyagv@nyagv.org
www.nyagv.org

NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security
777 United Nations Plaza, 3B
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 687 5340
Fax: +1 212 687 1643
disarmtimes@earthlink.net
www.igc.org/disarm

Oxfam America
1112 16th Street
NW #600
Washington
DC
20036
USA
Telephone: +1 202 496 1304
Fax: +1 202 496 1190
jruthrauff@oxfamamerica.org
www.oxfamamerica.org
Oxfam International
355 Lexington Avenue, Third Floor
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 687 2091
Fax: +1 212 687 2092
nicola.reindorp@oxfaminternational.org
www.oxfam.org
Program on Global Security & Disarmament
3140 Tydings Hall
College Park
MD
20742
USA
Telephone: +1 301 405 4969
Fax: +1 301 405 8822
pgsd@gvpt.umd.edu
merrigold@erols.com
www.bsos.umd.edu/pgsd
Quaker United Nations Office – New York (QUNO)
777 United Nations Plaza
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 682 2745, +1 212 682 8713
Fax: +1 212 983 0034
sclarke@afsc.org
www.quno.org
Small Arms Working Group (SAWG)
C/O CDI
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW
Washington
DC
20036
USA
Telephone: +1 202 797 5283
Fax: +1 202 462 4559
rstohl@cdi.org
www.cdi.org
Task Force for Child Survival & Development
750 Commerce Drive, Suite 400
Decatur
Georgia
30030
USA
Telephone: +1 404 687 5635
Fax: +1 404 371 1087
mrosenberg@taskforce.org
www.taskforce.org
The Fund for Peace
1701 K Street NW, 11th Floor
Washington
DC
20006
USA
Telephone: +1 202 223 7940
Fax: +1 202 223 7947
pbaker@fundforpeace.org
www.fundforpeace.org
Trauma Foundation
San Francisco General Hospital
San Francisco
CA
94110
USA
Telephone: +1 415 821 8209
Fax: +1 415 282 2563
www.traumaf.org/
Veterans for Peace (VFP)
216 South Meramec Ave
St. Louis MO

63105
USA
Telephone: +1 314 725 6005
Fax: +1 314 725 7103
vfp@veteransforpeace.net
www.veteransforpeace.org

Vivat International
211 East 43rd Street, Suite 706
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 646 487 0003
Fax: +1 646 487 0004
maco@vivatinternational.org
www.vivatinternational.org
Watchlist on Children & Armed Conflict
C/o Women’s Commission for Refugee Women & Children
122 East 42nd Street, 12th Floor
New York
NY
101168
USA
Telephone: +1 212 551 2743
Fax: +1 212 551 3180
www.watchlist.org www.womenscommission.org
Women’s Action for New Directions (WAND)
691 Massachusetts Avenue
Arlington
MA
02476
USA
Telephone: +1 781 643 6740
Fax: +1 781 643 6740
info@wand.org
www.wand.org
Women’s International League for Peace & Freedom (WILPF)
777 UN Plaza, 6th Floor
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 682 1265
Fax: +1 212 286 8211
wilpfun@igc.org
www.reachingcriticalwill.org www.peacewomen.org
www.wilpf.int.ch
World Conference on Religion and Peace (WCRP)
777 United Nations Plaza, 9th Floor
New York
NY
10017
USA
Telephone: +1 212 687 2163
Fax: +1 212 983 0566
info@wcrp.org
www.wcrp.org
World Peace Foundation
79 John F. Kennedy Street
Cambridge
MA
02138
USA
Telephone: +1 617 496 9812
Fax: +1 617 491 8588
world_peace@harvard.edu
World Vision International (WV)
800 West Chestnut Avenue
Monrovia
CA
91741
USA
Telephone: +1 626 301 7715
Fax: +1 626 301 7786
don_brandt@wvi.org
www.wvi.org
Worldwatch Institute
25 Treasure Road
Riverhead
NY
11901
USA
Telephone: +1 631 369 6896
Fax: +1 626 608 3189
mrenner@optonline.net
www.worldwatch.org
Loretta Bondi (individual)
Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies
1717 Massachusetts Avenue NW, 5th Floor Washington
DC
20036
USA
Telephone: +1 202 663 5956
Fax: +1 202 663 5879
lbondi1@jhu.edu
http://transatlantic.sais-jhu.edu/bondi.php
Barbara Frey (individual)
214 Social Sciences Building
267 Avenue 19 South
Minneapolis
Minnesota
55455
USA
Telephone: +1 612 626 1879
Fax: +1 612 626 2242
freyx001@umn.edu
http://hrp.cla.umn.edu
Bill Godnick (individual)
USA
Telephone: +1 305 251 6813
w.h.godnick1@bradford.ac.uk wgodnick@aol.com wgodnick@international-alert.org
Matt Schroeder (individual)
Arms Sales Monitoring Project
Federation of American Scientists
1717 K Street
NW
Washington
DC
20036
USA
Telephone: +1 202 454 4693
Fax: +1 202 675 1010
mschroeder@fas.org
www.fas.org/asmp
Rachel Stohl (individual)
1779 Massachusetts Avenue NW Washington
DC
20036
USA
Telephone: +1 202 797 5283
Fax: +1 202 462 4559
rstohl@cdi.org
www.cdi.org
Daniel Webster (individual)
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
624 North Broadway
Baltimore
MD
21205
USA
Telephone: +1 410 614 3243
Fax: +1 410 614 9055
dwebster@jhsph.edu

Advertisements

Make a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

3 Responses to “2010: The Year the Second Amendment Dies?”

RSS Feed for Soldier For Liberty Comments RSS Feed

Lenin, Hitler, Stalin, Mao …. Obama? The tyrants are always for gun control—for YOUR safety of course. We know how those stories eneded.

In Britain and Australia, crime has soared since stringent gun controls were imposed. U.S. gun crimes are dropping, even as the economy tanks and illegal immigration crimes soar.

Do NOT allow the bureaucrats to steal our 2nd Amendment rights.

[…] Your gun rights are being seriously threatened by the UN Small Arms Treaty which our current administration is in favor of. If you are unaware that your gun rights are being immediately threatened, please see: 2010: The year the second amendment dies? […]


Where's The Comment Form?

Liked it here?
Why not try sites on the blogroll...

%d bloggers like this: