Free Education Materials for Patriots

Posted on February 1, 2010. Filed under: Army for Liberty Book Club | Tags: , , |

I feel it’s very important for us, as citizens, at this point in our history, to have a base of knowledge to go forth from.
There are so many important books, which no matter what the date, remain important and no less significant to our time.
 
To that end, I present here, a database from which you can actually obtain these books for free online, many in .pdf form (kindle friendly, I believe). I felt it was important to find them free for those of us whose incomes have become lessened or limited.
 
I list below the following I have found. I have tagged this into the Army For Liberty Book Club, so you may find it
there should you ever want easy access to this list of sources. I have included the link and description from Amazon, should you wish to purchase the book.
 
Niccolo Machiavelli  The Prince
 
Amazon Review
When Machiavelli’s brief treatise on Renaissance statecraft and princely power was posthumously published in 1532, it generated a debate that has raged unabated until the present day. Based upon Machiavelli’s first-hand experience as an emissary of the Florentine Republic to the courts of Europe, The Prince analyses the usually violent means by which men seize, retain, and lose political power. Machiavelli added a dimension of incisive realism to one of the major philosophical and political issues of his time, especially the relationship between public deeds and private morality. His book provides a remarkably uncompromising picture of the true nature of power, no matter in what era or by whom it is exercised.
 
 
George Orwell 1984
 
Amazon Review
Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell’s nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff’s attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell’s prescience of modern life–the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language–and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
  
 
 
George Orwell  Animal Farm
 
Amazon Review
Since its publication in 1946, George Orwell’s fable of a workers’ revolution gone wrong has rivaled Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea as the Shortest Serious Novel It’s OK to Write a Book Report About. (The latter is three pages longer and less fun to read.) Fueled by Orwell’s intense disillusionment with Soviet Communism, Animal Farm is a nearly perfect piece of writing, both an engaging story and an allegory that actually works. When the downtrodden beasts of Manor Farm oust their drunken human master and take over management of the land, all are awash in collectivist zeal. Everyone willingly works overtime, productivity soars, and for one brief, glorious season, every belly is full. The animals’ Seven Commandment credo is painted in big white letters on the barn. All animals are equal. No animal shall drink alcohol, wear clothes, sleep in a bed, or kill a fellow four-footed creature. Those that go upon four legs or wings are friends and the two-legged are, by definition, the enemy. Too soon, however, the pigs, who have styled themselves leaders by virtue of their intelligence, succumb to the temptations of privilege and power. “We pigs are brainworkers. The whole management and organisation of the farm depend on us. Day and night, we are watching over your welfare. It is for your sake that we drink that milk and eat those apples.” While this swinish brotherhood sells out the revolution, cynically editing the Seven Commandments to excuse their violence and greed, the common animals are once again left hungry and exhausted, no better off than in the days when humans ran the farm. Satire Animal Farm may be, but it’s a stony reader who remains unmoved when the stalwart workhorse, Boxer, having given his all to his comrades, is sold to the glue factory to buy booze for the pigs. Orwell’s view of Communism is bleak indeed, but given the history of the Russian people since 1917, his pessimism has an air of prophecy.
 
 
 
Aldous Huxley  A Brave New World
 
“Community, Identity, Stability” is the motto of Aldous Huxley’s utopian World State. Here everyone consumes daily grams of soma, to fight depression, babies are born in laboratories, and the most popular form of entertainment is a “Feelie,” a movie that stimulates the senses of sight, hearing, and touch. Though there is no violence and everyone is provided for, Bernard Marx feels something is missing and senses his relationship with a young women has the potential to be much more than the confines of their existence allow. Huxley foreshadowed many of the practices and gadgets we take for granted today–let’s hope the sterility and absence of individuality he predicted aren’t yet to come. –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
  
  
 
 
In Fahrenheit 451, Ray Bradbury’s classic, frightening vision of the future, firemen don’t put out fires–they start them in order to burn books. Bradbury’s vividly painted society holds up the appearance of happiness as the highest goal–a place where trivial information is good, and knowledge and ideas are bad. Fire Captain Beatty explains it this way, “Give the people contests they win by remembering the words to more popular songs…. Don’t give them slippery stuff like philosophy or sociology to tie things up with. That way lies melancholy.” Guy Montag is a book-burning fireman undergoing a crisis of faith. His wife spends all day with her television “family,” imploring Montag to work harder so that they can afford a fourth TV wall. Their dull, empty life sharply contrasts with that of his next-door neighbor Clarisse, a young girl thrilled by the ideas in books, and more interested in what she can see in the world around her than in the mindless chatter of the tube. When Clarisse disappears mysteriously, Montag is moved to make some changes, and starts hiding books in his home. Eventually, his wife turns him in, and he must answer the call to burn his secret cache of books. After fleeing to avoid arrest, Montag winds up joining an outlaw band of scholars who keep the contents of books in their heads, waiting for the time society will once again need the wisdom of literature.
 
 
 
G. Edward Griffin  The Fearful Master: A Second Look At The United Nations
 
Amazon Reivew
“A hard-hitting, carefully documented book–and a healthy antidote to the UN-can-do-no-wrong propaganda…”
 
 
Edward Bernays  Propaganda
 
Amazon Review
“The conscious and intelligent manipulation of the organized habits and opinions of the masses is an important element in democratic society. Those who manipulate this unseen mechanism of society constitute an invisible government which is the true ruling power of our country.”-Edward Bernays, Propaganda

A seminal and controversial figure in the history of political thought and public relations, Edward Bernays (18911995), pioneered the scientific technique of shaping and manipulating public opinion, which he famously dubbed “engineering of consent.” During World War I, he was an integral part of the U.S. Committee on Public Information (CPI), a powerful propaganda apparatus that was mobilized to package, advertise and sell the war to the American people as one that would “Make the World Safe for Democracy.” The CPI would become the blueprint in which marketing strategies for future wars would be based upon.

Bernays applied the techniques he had learned in the CPI and, incorporating some of the ideas of Walter Lipmann, became an outspoken proponent of propaganda as a tool for democratic and corporate manipulation of the population. His 1928 bombshell Propaganda lays out his eerily prescient vision for using propaganda to regiment the collective mind in a variety of areas, including government, politics, art, science and education. To read this book today is to frightfully comprehend what our contemporary institutions of government and business have become in regards to organized manipulation of the masses.

  
Zbigniew Brzezinski – Between Two Ages
Amazon Review
[The author’s] range of investigation sweeps from New Left politics to the bureaucratization of Soviet communism. Mostly, he examines the ambivalence inherent in America’s dual role as disseminator of the technetronic revolution and principal preserver of the international status quo. Brzezinski’s optimistic conclusions may comfort a few, but his cavalier treatment of contrary analyses, combined with his past record of undistinguished prognostication, can hardly leave them smug. The opinions are strong and, in general, challenge everyone, from the concerned layman to the practicing scholar.
 
 
Amazon Review Not Available
1935 book
Paul Warburg was one of the principle architects of the New Deal. However, he quickly became disgusted with it for the reasons contained in this 1935 book. This book is a truly great analysis of the New Deal using the 1932 Socialist platform as an analysis tool. His second book printed in the fall of 1936 was titled “Still Hell Bent” and concerned itself with three propositions advanced by the media in favor of Roosevelt’s re-election:

  1. The public disliked the New Deal but liked less the prospect of returning to the status quo ante.
  2. The public was better off in 1935 than 1933 and Roosevelt was responsible.
  3. Roosevelt himself made a lot of mistakes, was superficial and impetuous, but at least he tried and if re-elected would go on trying.

Warburg demonstrated that propositions 1 and 2 were false and that three was a confusion – FDR confused mere activity or change with progress. Whenever he clearly identified a purpose, his actions would accomplish almost exactly the opposite, and the proposals FDR would keep on “trying” were clearly inconsistent with helping the less fortunate.

 
Ronald Reagan  World Communism and Domestic Socialism
 
22 page text in pdf of his very important speech. Not a book, per se, but none the less important.
 
 
 
I will try to provide additional books going forward once a month or so and will place them all in the book club category.
 
Happy reading.
 
 
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One Response to “Free Education Materials for Patriots”

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Just read the Reagan speach. Thanks!
I heard about a new book by Thomas Sowell called Conflict of Visions. I plan on reading it.


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